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COMPLETE JAVA SWING TUTORIAL PDF

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This second edition of Java Swing thoroughly covers all the features available in Java 2 SDK and . Programming with Accessibility . This book gives a complete introduction to the entire Swing component set. .. of you still working with JDK , we've included a PDF containing the " Keyboard Actions" section. The Definitive Guide to Java Swing, Third Edition Event Handling with the Swing Component Set. .. A Complete Popup/PopupFactory Usage Example. Programming in simple and easy steps. This tutorial provides great understanding on JAVA. GUI Programming concepts and after completing this tutorial you.


Complete Java Swing Tutorial Pdf

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Introduction to the Java Swing Toolkit. About this tutorial. This is an introductory Swing tutorial. The purpose of this tutorial is to get you started with the Java. Java Swing tutorial is a part of Java Foundation Classes (JFC) that is used to create window-based applications. It is built on the top of AWT (Abstract Windowing. Learn about event-driven programming techniques. • Practice learning and using a large, complex API. • A chance to see how it is designed and learn from it.

Container classes are classes that can have other components on it.

So for creating a GUI, we need at least one container object. There are 3 types of containers. Panel: It is a pure container and is not a window in itself. The sole purpose of a Panel is to organize the components on to a window. Frame: It is a fully functioning window with its title and icons.

Dialog: It can be thought of like a pop-up window that pops out when a message has to be displayed. The method toggleChanged displays the state of all the models registered in the list of models for the BitOutputConsole.

List; import np. ToggleListener; import np. After that a parent container for the custom components, JFrame is initialized to whose content pane, 8 pairs of toggle switch and toggle LED sharing a separate toggle model is added using flowlayout, layout manager.

Each pair of toggle switch and toggle LED sharing a toggle model is instantiated with the help of static method called addToggleSet.

It creates a box container, to which the switch and LED pair is added, which in turn is added to the container. Finally the main class packs the added boxes, sets the default close operation and makes the frame visible. WHITE ; frame. Create the model reuse existing model if possible 2. Create the JComponent, listen to the model and repaint when model changes 3. Create the ComponentUI, paint based on the state of the model 4. Create the Controller, listen to mouse and keyboard events; change the model when these events occur.

A System of Patterns. Java Swing. Design patterns — elements of reusable object-oriented software. Addison Wesley, Dean Helman.

Web, May Building user interfaces for object-oriented systems, part 1 — what is an object? Microsoft Press, Professional WPF Program- ming:. Wiley, The JLabels are added to the form creating a second row, as shown in the following illustration. Nodes representing each component are added to the Navigator window.

Table of contents

Before moving on, we need to edit the JLabels' name so that we'll be able to see the effect of the alignments we'll set later. Type Title: and press Enter. Repeat steps 1 and 2, entering Nickname: for the second JLabel's name property. The JLabels' new names are displayed in the form and are shifted as a result of their edited widths, as shown in the following illustration.

Inserting Components Note: Refer to the Inserting components. Often it is necessary to add a component between components that are already placed in a form. Whenever you add a component between two existing components, the GUI Builder automatically shifts them to make room for the new component.

To demonstrate this, we'll insert a JTextField between the JLabels we added previously, as shown in the following two illustrations. Move the cursor over the Title: and Nickname: JLabels on the second row such that the JTextField overlaps both and is aligned to their baselines.

If you encounter difficulty positioning the new text field, you can snap it to the left guideline of the Nickname JLabel as shown in the first image below.

The rightmost JLabel shifts toward the right of the JTextField to accommodate the suggested horizontal offset. We still need to add one additional JTextField to the form that will display each contact's nickname on the right side of the form. Move the cursor to the right of the Nickname label and click to place the text field.

When the vertical alignment guidelines appear suggesting the margin between the text field and JPanel edges, release the mouse button to resize the JTextField. Press Ctrl-S to save the file. Next, we'll take a more in depth look at the GUI Builder's alignment features as we work with the various other components we need for our application. Component Alignment Note: Refer to the Aligning and anchoring components.

Every time you add a component to a form, the GUI Builder effectively aligns them, as evidenced by the alignment guidelines that appear. It is sometimes necessary, however, to specify different relationships between groups of components as well. Now we'll align the two columns of JLabels so that their right edges line up. Click the Align Right in Column button in the toolbar.

The JLabels' positions shift such that the right edges of their display text are aligned. The anchoring relationships are updated, indicating that the components have been grouped.

Java Programming Tutorial

Before we're finished with the JTextFields we added earlier, we need to make sure that the two JTextFields we inserted between the JLabels are set to resize correctly.

Unlike the two JTextFields that we stretched to the right edge of our form, inserted components' resizeability behavior isn't automatically set. The JTextFields are set to resize horizontally at runtime.

The alignment guidelines and anchoring indicators are updated, providing visual feedback of the component relationships. To set components to be the same size: Control-click all four of the JTextFields in the form to select them. The JTextFields are all set to the same width and indicators are added to the top edge of each, providing visual feedback of the component relationships. Now we need to add another JLabel describing the JComboBox that will enable users to select the format of the information our ContactEditor application will display.

Programming Graphical User Interface (GUI) - Part 2

When the guideline appears indicating that the new JLabel's right edge is aligned with the right edges of the component group above the two JLabels , click to position the component. The JLabel snaps into a right-aligned position with the column of JLabels above, as shown in the following illustration. The GUI Builder updates the alignment status lines indicating the component's spacing and anchoring relationships. As in the previous examples, double-click the JLabel to select its display text and then enter Display Format: for the display name.

Notice that when the JLabel snaps into position, the other components shift to accommodate the longer display text. Baseline Alignment Whenever you add or move components that include text JLabels, JTextFields, and so forth , the IDE suggests alignments which are based on the baselines of the text in the components.

When we inserted the JTextField earlier, for example, its baseline was automatically aligned to the adjacent JLabels. Now we'll add the combo box that will enable users to select the format of the information that our ContactEditor application will display. Notice once again the baseline alignment guidelines that appear to assist us with the positioning. To align the baselines of components: In the Palette window, select the Combo Box component from the Swing Controls category.

Move the cursor immediately to the right of the JLabel we just added. When the horizontal guideline appears indicating that the JComboBox's baseline is aligned with the baseline of the text in the JLabel and the spacing between the two components is suggested with a vertical guideline, click to position the combo box.

The component snaps into a position aligned with the baseline of the text in the JLabel to its left, as shown in the following illustration. The GUI Builder displays status lines indicating the component's spacing and anchoring relationships. Drag the resize handle on the JComboBox's right edge toward the right until the alignment guidelines appear suggesting the preferred offset between the JComboBox and JPanel edges.

As shown in the following illustration, the JComboBox's right edge snaps into alignment with the JPanel's recommended edge margin and the component's width is automatically set to resize with the form. Editing component models is beyond the scope of this tutorial, so for the time being we'll leave the JComboBox's placeholder item list as it is.

It is important to understand, however, that another integral part of component placement is anchoring. Though we haven't discussed it yet, you've already taken advantage of this feature without realizing it.

As mentioned previously, whenever you add a component to a form, the IDE suggests the target look and feel's preferred positioning with guidelines. Once placed, new components are also anchored to the nearest container edge or component to ensure that component relationships are maintained at runtime. In this section, we'll concentrate on accomplishing the tasks in a more streamlined fashion while pointing out the work the GUI builder is doing behind the scenes.

Adding, Aligning, and Anchoring The GUI Builder enables you to lay out your forms quickly and easily by streamlining typical workflow gestures.

Designing a Swing GUI in NetBeans IDE

Whenever you add a component to a form, the GUI Builder automatically snaps them into the preferred positions and sets the necessary chaining relationships so you can concentrate on designing your forms rather than struggling with complicated implementation details. To add, align, and edit the display text of a JLabel: In the Palette window, select the Label component from the Swing Controls category.

Move the cursor over the form immediately below the bottom JPanel's E-mail title. When the guidelines appear indicating that it's positioned in the top left corner of the JPanel with a small margin at the top and left edges, click to place the JLabel. Double-click the JLabel to select its display text. Then type E-mail Address: and press Enter. The JLabel snaps into the preferred position in the form, anchored to the top and left edges of the enclosing JPanel.

Just as before, a corresponding node representing the component is added to the Navigator window. Move the cursor immediately to the right of the E-mail Address label we just added. When the guidelines appear indicating that the JTextField's baseline is aligned with the baseline of the text in the JLabel and the margin between the two components is suggested with a vertical guideline, click to position the text field.

Its corresponding node is also added to the Inspector window. The JTextField's right edge snaps to the alignment guideline indicating the preferred margins. Now we need to add the JList that will display our ContactEditor's entire contact list. Move the cursor immediately below the E-mail Address JLabel we added earlier. When the guidelines appear indicating that the JList's top and left edges are aligned with the preferred margins along the JPanel's left edge and the JLabel above, click to position the JList.

Drag the JList's right resize handle toward the right of the enclosing JPanel until the alignment guidelines appear indicating that it is the same width as the JTextField above. The JList snaps into the position designated by the alignment guidelines and its corresponding node is displayed in the Inspector window.

Notice also that the form expands to accommodate the newly added JList. Since JLists are used to display long lists of data, they typically require the addition of a JScrollPane. Component Sizing Note: Refer to the Resizing and indenting components. It is often beneficial to set several related components, such as buttons in modal dialogues, to be the same size for visual consistency.

To demonstrate this we'll add four JButtons to our ContactEditor form that will allow us to add, edit, and remove individual entries from our contact list, as shown in the following illustrations.

Afterwards, we'll set the four buttons to be the same size so they can be easily recognized as offering related functionality.

To add, align, and edit the display text of multiple buttons: In the Palette window, select the Button component from the Swing Controls category.JLabel we added earlier. Move the cursor over the Title: and Nickname: JLabels on the second row such that the JTextField overlaps both and is aligned to their baselines. First we'll accomplish this using the Properties window and then we'll try it using the pop-up menu.

JComboBox fires ItemEvent. View is responsible for displaying the state of the model on a device.