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PUBLIC SPEAKING AN AUDIENCE CENTERED APPROACH PDF

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[Matching item] Public speaking: an audience-centered approach / Steven A. Beebe, Texas State University, Susan J. Beebe, Texas State University. - Ninth Edition. - Tenth edition. 4. Public speaking: an audience-centered approach. by Steven A Beebe · Public speaking: an audience-centered approach. by Steven A Beebe. Print book. Test Bank (Download Only) for Public Speaking: An Audience-Centered Approach, 10th Edition. Steven A. Beebe, Texas State University - San Marcos. Susan J.


Public Speaking An Audience Centered Approach Pdf

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Public Speaking: An Audience-Centered Approach PDF eBook, Global Edition, 9/ E. View larger cover. Steven A. Beebe, Southwest Texas State University. An audience-centered approach to public speaking Public Speaking: An However, this book is just a pdf wrapped inside an amazon format. That means if you. Public Speaking: An Audience-Centered Approach outlines a comprehensive process for new public speakers to ensure they continually connect to their.

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We don't recognize your username or password. Is the source accountable? How accurate are the sources of facts, and have they been validated? Is the information presented in an objective manner? How current is the information? Is the presentation of information diversity-sensitive? A third source of supporting material is the library. The student can use a variety of resources such as books, periodicals, general interest magazines and professional journals, and on-line databases.

Public Speaking

A fourth type of supporting material is the result of interviews. Knowing that answers are not available in stored materials, students and researchers find interviews to be a very effective source although good interviews require a lot of preparation beforehand. Interviews should be well planned, have a specific purpose, specific set ups, and they require securing appointments and permission to record.

The student has to gather background information and plan specific questions, sequences and recording strategies before conducting the interview. Effective interviews should provide follow- up as well. Finally, the fifth and last source of supporting material is resources from special-interest groups and organizations. Many students use resources from business and industrial groups, non-profit organizations, and other professional societies because they produce leaflets, books and fact sheets about an extraordinarily wide variety of subjects.

Based on his or her audience analysis and the purpose, the student can incorporate a variety of supporting details such as narratives or anecdotes, examples, definitions, explanations, testimony, facts and statistics, analogy and visual illustrations.

Organize Your Speech The fourth step of the speech-making process is organizing ideas in the speech. The three parts of the speech are an introduction, body, and conclusion. Coopman and Lull suggest applying the principles of clarity, relevance and balance to help students identify what points to include and what points to leave out of the speech: Clarity refers to choosing main ideas that clearly illustrate to the audience what the speech is about and the response the speaker seeks.

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Therefore, the main ideas must support the specific purpose of the student and be consistent with the thesis. Relevance is choosing main ideas that pertain directly to the topic and are relevant to one another.

Balance is considering the amount of time and information for each point in the speech.

Students should aim for equal balance between all points in relation to the topic and to the other points and should also plan to talk about each of them for about the same amount of time.

Finally, after selecting elaborations on the main points of the speech, the student should organize these ideas in a clear and logical pattern that appeals to the audience. Rehearse Your Speech Practicing the speech effectively requires devoting quality time to rehearsing the presentation; however, the speech should be spontaneous, engaging and dynamic, not one that is programmed and predictable. Rehearsing can be done in stages and should be timed; practicing each part at a time and then practicing the whole speech.

Well-practiced and sufficient rehearsals give the student confidence and more control during the actual delivery of the speech.

Test Bank (Download Only) for Public Speaking: An Audience-Centered Approach, 10th Edition

Deliver Your Speech Audiences will not expect a perfect speech, as there is always room for improvement. However, students should strive to make the best impression they can and achieve the purpose and goal of the speech within the time limit. Delivery factors or elements should be practiced during the rehearsal step.

These factors include managing the speaker's voice, body language, and audience. To begin with, the voice is a key tool for getting the audience's attention, emphasizing points, stirring emotions, and conveying the content of message.

In fact, good voice volume, variations in vocal qualities, minimal pauses, and clear articulation and pronunciation are essential for effective public speaking. Moreover, the speaker's body should convey poise and enthusiasm. Knowing what to do and how to move can significantly reduce speech anxiety. Some guidelines for using the body effectively include making good eye contact, displaying appropriate facial expression, maintaining good posture, and moving with purpose and spontaneity.

Finally, managing the audience begins with researching the listeners and designing the message to achieve their goals as well as the speaker's.

The student can help influence an audience's response by adjusting the speaking space during the speech, involving the audience through questions and getting feedback, and respecting the audience's time. To summarize, the speech making process using an audience-centered approach focuses on listeners' needs, knowledge, and interest so that the student can use supporting materials that fit the audience, topic and occasion. Only then can the student design a speech that is likely to accomplish his or her objectives.

Part Two: Know Your Audience In this part of the article, the first step of the speech making process Know Your Audience will be highlighted and discussed. Being audience-centered does not mean to tell audiences only what they want to hear or fabricate information to please the audience.

Even if they are not persuaded, the goal is to make an audience go away feeling at least thoughtful, rather than offended or hostile. Gather information about the target audience 2. Analyze data 3. The speaker should gather demographic and psychological information about his or her target audience.

These essential data are gathered through interviews, surveys, and questionnaires. The speaker will then adapt the message of the speech before, during, and after the presentation, using the information gathered in the initial stages to gain the audience's attention and build speaker credibility.

To ensure successful delivery of the message, students define their purpose and develop a detailed profile of the target audience. This recognition will strengthen the impact of the message.

After students establish a clear purpose, the next step is to form a comprehensive profile of the audience. To be able to create this analysis, students have to prepare a set of key questions that will help them to become aware of their audience's needs, wants, views, and values. Students will design an interview, survey or questionnaire to help them gather the information they need for their speech.

Who is my intended audience? What is the purpose of my speech? How much does the audience know? What do they want to know? What are the audience demographics?

What are their interests, needs, wants, beliefs psychological outline? What are their concerns and expectations? The students will structure their speech using this awareness and respect of other points of view, which is a way to gain credibility and the interest of the audience.Demographic Analysis.

On-line Supplement. Relevance is choosing main ideas that pertain directly to the topic and are relevant to one another. The student can help influence an audience's response by adjusting the speaking space during the speech, involving the audience through questions and getting feedback, and respecting the audience's time.

A second source of supporting material is the internet.