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PRACTICAL SKILLS IN FORENSIC SCIENCE PDF

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You will also need broader skills, for example, in relation to teamwork and study. Practical Skills in Forensic Science provides an easy-to-read guide to help you. Practical Skills In Forensic Science. Read more Practical Skills for Police Community Support Officers (Practical Policing Skills). Read more. Langford, Alan, Dean, John, Reed, Robert, Holmes, David, Weyers, Jonathan and Jones, Allan () Practical skills in forensic science [2nd.


Practical Skills In Forensic Science Pdf

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practical skills in forensic pdf practical skills in forensic science 50 SSR December , 91() Practical work in school science – why is it important ?. Get Free Read & Download Files Practical Skills In Forensic Science PDF. PRACTICAL SKILLS IN FORENSIC SCIENCE. Download: Practical Skills In Forensic. staff skill requirements and equipment recommendations for forensic science laboratories 50 ssr december , 91() practical work in school science –.

Table 1. There are many possible classifications — and a different one may be used in your institution or field of study.

However, although this text deals primarily with the skills and techniques required for laboratory practicals, crime scene and associated studies at university, a broader range of material is included. This is because the skills concerned are important, not only in forensic science but also in the wider world.

Examples include time management, evaluating information and communicating effectively. The importance that your lecturers place on practical skills will probably be evident from the large proportion of curriculum time you will spend on practical work in your course or programme. Example The skills involved in teamwork cannot be developed without a deeper understanding of the inter-relationships involved in successful groups.

The context will be different for every group and a flexible approach will always be required, according to the individuals involved and the nature of the task. Of course, some of the tasks you will be asked to carry out in practical classes will be repetitive. Certain techniques require manual dexterity and attention to detail if accuracy and precision are to be attained, and the necessary competence often requires practice to make perfect.

However, a deeper understanding of the context of a technique is important if the skill is to be appreciated fully and then transferred to a new situation. Transferability of skills Transferable skills are those which allow someone with knowledge, understanding or ability gained in one situation to adapt or extend this for application in a different context.

In some cases, the transfer of a skill is immediately obvious. Take, for example, the ability to use a spreadsheet to summarise biological and chemical data and create a graph to illustrate results. This is not only true for similar data sets, but also in unrelated situations, such as making up a financial balance sheet and creating a pie chart to show sources of expenditure.

Other cases may be less clear but equally valid. For example, towards the end of your undergraduate studies you may be involved in designing experiments as part of your project work. How and when might you transfer this complex set of skills? In the workplace, it is unlikely that you would be asked to repeat the same process, but in critically evaluating a problem or in planning a complex project for a new employer, you will need to use many of the timemanagement, organisational and analytical skills developed when designing and carrying out experiments.

The same applies to information retrieval and evaluation and writing essays and dissertations, when transferred to the task of analysing or writing a business report. What your future employer will be looking for At the end of your course or programme, which may seem some time away, you will aim to get a job and start on your chosen career path.

You will need to sell yourself to your future employer, firstly in your application form and curriculum vitae Chapter 7 , and perhaps later at interview.

Many forensic science students seek employment across a broad range of occupations on completion of their degree programmes, and companies rarely employ graduates simply because they know how to carry out a particular lab routine or because they can remember specific facts about their chosen degree subject.

This encompasses, for example, the ability to work in a team, to speak effectively and write clearly about your work, to understand complex data and to manage a project to completion.

Also by Alan M Langford

All of these skills can be developed at different stages during your university studies. KEY POINT Factual knowledge can be important in degrees with a strong vocational element and this will be important to students who become forensic science practitioners. However, for others, understanding how to find and evaluate information is usually rated more highly by employers than the narrow ability to memorise facts. Most likely, your future employer s will seek someone with an organised yet flexible mind, capable of demonstrating a logical approach to problems — someone who has a range of skills and who can transfer these skills to new situations.

Many competing applicants will probably have similar qualifications. If you want the job, you will have to show that your additional skills place you above the other candidates.

Gower Publishing Ltd, Aldershot. Race, P. Open University Press, Buckingham.

Managing your time One of the most important activities that you can do is to organise your personal and working time effectively. In fact, research shows that most people use up a lot of their time without realising it through ineffective study or activities such as extended coffee breaks. Developing your time management skills will help you achieve more in work, rest and play, but it is important to remember that putting time management techniques into practice is an individual matter, requiring a level of self-discipline not unlike that required for dieting or for sporting success.

An inability to organise your time effectively, of course, results in the opposite of the above, especially feelings of failure, frustration, guilt and being out of control in your life.

Setting your goals The first step is to identify clearly what you want to achieve, both in work and in your personal life. We all have a general idea of what we are aiming for, but to be effective, your goals must be clearly identified and priorities allocated. Clear concise objectives can provide you with a framework in which to make these choices.

Measurable — having quantified targets and benefits to provide an understanding of progress.

Practical Skills In Forensic Science

Achievable — being attainable within your resources. Realistic — being within your abilities and expectations. Timed — stating the time period for completion. Having identified your goals, you can now move on to answer four very important questions: 1.

Where does your time go? Where should your time go? What are your time-wasting activities?

What strategies can help you? Write activities along the top of the page, and divide the day into minute segments as shown. Think beforehand how you will categorise the different things you do, from the mundane laundry, having a shower, drinking coffee, etc. At the end of each day, place a dot in the relevant column for each activity and sum the dots to give a total at the bottom of the page.

You will need to keep a diary like this for at least a week before you see patterns emerging. Start by keeping a detailed time log for a typical week Fig. What range of activities do I do?

How long do I spend on each activity? What do I spend most of my time doing? What do I spend the least amount of my time doing? Are my allocations of time in proportion to the importance of my activities? How much of my time is ineffectively used, e.

If you wish, you could use a spreadsheet Chapter 11 to produce graphical summaries of time allocations in different categories as an aid to analysis and management. Maintenance time — time spent supporting your general life activities shopping, cleaning, laundry, etc. Discretionary time — time for you to use as you wish, e.

Practical Skills in Chemistry (PSK)

Avoiding time-wasting activities Look carefully at those tasks that could be identified as time-wasting activities. They include gossiping, over-long breaks, uninvited interruptions and even ineffective study periods.

Try to reduce these to a minimum, but do not count on eliminating them entirely. Remember also that some relaxation should be programmed into your daily schedule. Indicate clearly on your door that you do not wish to be disturbed and explain why.

Otherwise, try to work away from disturbance. Decide when these times are for you and programme your work accordingly. Plan relaxation events for periods when you tend to be less alert. Use checklists as often as possible — post your lists in places where they are easily and frequently visible, such as in front of your desk.

Ticking things off as they are completed gives you a feeling of accomplishment and progress, increasing motivation. Organising your tasks Having analysed your time usage, you can now use this information, together with your objectives and prioritised goals, to organise your activities, both on a short-term and a long-term basis.

Routine — predictable and regular and therefore easily scheduled e. Alan Langford. Pearson Academic , This specific ISBN edition is currently not available. View all copies of this ISBN edition: Synopsis About this title If you are studying forensic science, or a related course such as forensic chemistry or biology, then this book will be an indispensable companion throughout your entire degree programme.

About the Author: Buy New View Book. Customers who bought this item also bought. Stock Image. Published by Prentice Hall New Paperback Quantity Available: Revaluation Books Exeter, United Kingdom.

Seller Rating: Published by Pearson Academic Achievable — being attainable within your resources. Adapted by permission of Pearson Education, Inc. In the workplace, it is unlikely that you would be asked to repeat the same process, but in critically evaluating a problem or in planning a complex project for a new employer, you will need to use many of the timemanagement, organisational and analytical skills developed when designing and carrying out experiments.

We all have a general idea of what we are aiming for, but to be effective, your goals must be clearly identified and priorities allocated. Updated sections on software for graphical and statistical analysis.

At the end of each day, place a dot in the relevant column for each activity and sum the dots to give a total at the bottom of the page. This one-stop text will guide you through the wide range of practical, analytical and data handling skills that you will need during your studies.