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EFFECTIVE EXECUTIVE PDF

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Books by Peter E Drucker &Joseph A. Maciariello. The Effective Executive in Action. Books by Peter E Drucker. MANAGEMENT. The Daily Drucker ( withJoseph. @sajithpai. 1. The Effective Executive ( pages, ). Peter Drucker. Preface + Introduction. The subject of this book is managing oneself for effectiveness. The Effective Executive by Peter F. Drucker. An Introduction. To be effective is the job of the executive. Whether he works in a business or in a hospital, in a.


Effective Executive Pdf

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The Effective Executive: The Definitive Guide to Getting and millions of other books are available for instant access. view Kindle eBook | view Audible. generous or tightfisted, visionary or numbers oriented. But every effective executive follows eight simple practices. AN EFFECTIVE EXECUTIVE does not need to. Who is Peter Drucker? Peter Ferdinand Drucker (‐), was an educator, management consultant and author. Born in Austria, Peter has contributed.

Firstly, we need to record actual time usage. The method is unimportant, but the identification of where time is spent is essential and is best done in real time. With an idea of what you are doing with your time you can then ask some investigative questions: 1.

Identify what does not need to be done and is only wasting time? What can be done by someone else and probably better?

What do I do that uses time without being effective? These questions help identify the time leaks. These normally fit into 4 categories: 1. Time is wasted due to lack of planning, foresight or a system. Time wasted due to over staffing and things therefore takeing longer than required. Time is wasted due to mal-organisation leading to having too many meetings and discussions. Time is wasted due to poor information flow, format or availability.

Having established where the time leaks are, an effective executive can now reduce the leaks and build more discretionary time. Now that time needs to be used effectively!

What is the content, level, standard, quality and impact in your work or your relationships? The executive needs to identify where his narrow skill, his speciality and his department adds most to the performance of the whole organisation. They ask how can I contribute here and to what standard do I need to complete it? This is a particularly important factor in motivating a knowledge worker. Focusing on contribution supplies four basic requirements of effective human relations: 1.

Communication is improved because team members understand what their contribution is towards the whole. Teamwork is enhanced because the focus on contribution drives teams to collaborate and communicate their contribution to that whole. They ask, 'who needs my output for it to be effective?

Self development benefits because a executive focusing on contribution will often identify additional knowledge or skills they need to better contribute. Individual development often improves because the executive sets the self development standard for the organisation. To focus on contribution is to focus on effectiveness! Chapter 4 — Making Strength Productive The effective executive makes a personal, a team or an organisational strength as productive as possible.

They identify personal, team and organisational strengths and apply them effectively. If a strength isn't present, the executive needs to identify strength in an external person and hire them. The key is to find someone who can contribute strongly to the output and then give then a good job. So what constitutes a good job? Each job must be well designed so that it can be achieved by one appropriately skilled person.

Each job must be big and demanding so as to challenge the person in it. Each job must be designed by what the man can do not what is required. Each job needs to reflect a relevant strength without succumbing to a weakness in the person completing it.

The executive then takes responsibility for the performance of the individual.

The Effective Executive

They guide the individual to use their strength and make the best contribution. This approach is also useful when managing upwards.

Identify the contribution and strengths of a senior manager and adapt your contribution to meet their needs. As to the executive himself, he needs to also provide contribution through his personal strengths. He also needs to have a more strategic view and identify how best the contributions of all can benefit the organisation.

The key principle being to feed the opportunities and starve the problems. The task of the executive therefore is not to change individuals but to multiply output and performance by applying each person to his strength and aspirations. Chapter 5 — First Things First If there is one 'secret' of effectiveness then it is the ability to concentrate.

Effective executives do first things first and one at a time. They do this with passion, discipline and focus. It is necessary, particularly with the executive because so many elements are demanding his time. The more he can concentrate his effort and resources, the more that can be achieved The key elements of putting the first thing first are: 1.

Pick future potential over poor past performance, focus on what may be productive rather than what you know hasn't been!

Focus on the opportunity rather than the problem. This makes you think of the future and what needs to be done first rather than the problem which is rooted in the past. Set your priorities with courage rather than intelligent analysis.

You will never have all the information you need so be brave. Choose your own direction rather than following the crowd. Determine if the issue is a generic problem or a true exception.

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Always initially assume that the issue in question is a symptom of some generic problem; this assumption will be correct most of the time. Sometimes it will require more than a superficial look to see the real relationship between the symptom or several related symptoms and the true, generic cause. This is often the case with problems that tend to recur. If a situation turns out to be totally unique, assume that it is a symptom of a new generic problem and seek a new generic solution.

If not, or if the results deviate from the expectations, rethink the explanation and solution and try again. It may take a good bit of experimentation to arrive at a final generic solution.

Don't settle for the quick fix. Too often what is starts out as a stop-gap measure designed to provide an immediate yet temporary solution, winds up being permanent this is the rule of "longevity of temporary". Clearly specify what should happen as a result of the decision and thus how the problem will be solved.

State the minimum goals that will be acceptable as a solution and identify any "boundary conditions," that is, pre-existing circumstances that, if they change, will have an impact on the results. Clearly stating boundary conditions is as important as clearly stating specific goals. Being able to see a change in boundary conditions makes it easier to see when or if a decision or strategy needs to be abandoned. Clearly establishing boundary conditions also helps identify the worst of all decisions: "the decision that just might work if nothing goes wrong.

Convert decisions into actions. No decision has been made until carrying it out becomes someone's responsibility. Until it gets done, it is only good intentions. Be sure the plan matches the abilities of the people who will have to carry the decision out and that there are enough people available to effectively execute it. This issue is even more important if people have to change attitudes, habits, behavior, objectives or standards of evaluation such as when a company switches from a customer service philosophy to a profit focus.

Build feedback into the decision process. Have a plan for monitoring the results of the decision against the goals and expectations. Ultimately that leaves one vulnerable to having their decisions become obsolete with no ready alternatives or plans for change, or to have old plans continually implemented long after they had become obsolete, no longer effective, or even rational.

Treating a generic situation as if it was a series of unique events. Treating a new event as if it were an old problem to which old rules should be applied.

The Effective Executive

Having a plausible but incorrect definition of the fundamental problem. Having an incomplete definition of the fundamental problem; incomplete explanations are frequently worse than totally wrong explanations.

At best a decision can be a choice between "almost right" and "probably wrong," but more often a decision involves choosing between two courses of action, neither of which is probably a great deal more right than the other. Here are some ways to make the most effective decisions more frequently: 1.

Determine what is truly relevant 2. Consider all alternatives 3. To make an effective decision, ignore all factors that are not relevant. Consider all alternatives, seeking out opposing viewpoints. Disagreements not only provide viable alternatives, but can stimulate the imagination as well.

Organize disagreements and make a special effort to understand the thinking behind the different ideas. Finally ask, "Is a decision really necessary?

Determine whether action or inaction is the best alternative by comparing the risk and rewards of each. Choose to act if the benefits greatly outweigh the costs or risks. Either act or do not act, but do not hedge or compromise. Be A Great Manager of Time.

Record and analyze where your time goes, eliminating all unnecessary time wasters. Be prepared to exorcise those things even those things you like doing from your schedule that keep you from getting as much accomplished as you could. Allocate a substantial amount of your time to large, 90 minute blocks where you can work uninterrupted on important things. Focus on results and meaningful contributions.

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Think about why you're getting paid and what contributions you should be making. Use the answers to make demands on yourself, thinking about your own goals as well as those of the organization, and concerning yourself with values, high standards and developing employees. Make decisions based on strengths not on weaknesses. Approach co-workers and superiors with an attitude of 1 capitalizing on their current strengths and 2 helping them to utilize these strengths in challenging and responsible positions so they can make even more meaningful contributions.

Likewise, evaluate ideas based on their merits, not their pitfalls.

Do first things first and second things not at all. Determine what task will yield the most beneficial results and focus as much time and effort on it as possible. Upon completing that task, re-examine the situation and pick the next most important task to begin working on.

Allocate sufficient time to complete all truly important tasks. Choose not to tackle any task that is not a priority. Make effective decisions by determining what is relevant, considering all alternatives and choosing to either take or not take action.

Instead, clearly state how a problem will be solved as permanently as possible; include as part of the solution the goals of the decision and the factors that could impact success. Be sure the staff is sufficient in number and is capable of executing the plan.

Take action. Until someone takes action, it is only good intentions. Monitor the progress firsthand. As to the executive himself. Each job must be well designed so that it can be achieved by one appropriately skilled person. He also needs to have a more strategic view and identify how best the contributions of all can benefit the organisation.

Each job must be big and demanding so as to challenge the person in it. This approach is also useful when managing upwards. They do this with passion. They identify personal. The key principle being to feed the opportunities and starve the problems. Chapter 5 — First Things First If there is one 'secret' of effectiveness then it is the ability to concentrate.

It is necessary. The task of the executive therefore is not to change individuals but to multiply output and performance by applying each person to his strength and aspirations. They guide the individual to use their strength and make the best contribution. Identify the contribution and strengths of a senior manager and adapt your contribution to meet their needs.

So what constitutes a good job? If a strength isn't present. Pick future potential over poor past performance. Each job must be designed by what the man can do not what is required. The executive then takes responsibility for the performance of the individual. Effective executives do first things first and one at a time. Chapter 6 — The Elements of Decision-making Decision making is specifically an executive role.

This requires a systematic approach with clearly defined elements. Is this a generic or unique decision?

Generic questions have normally been answered. That way you can always avoid an early or incorrect compromise. Convert the decision into action. This is an impossible task to achieve and even more difficult to analyse if it where achievable. Concentration then is the courage to impose on time the decision to act on the things that matter most and make time and events your servant rather than becoming theirs.

Aim at what is right rather than on what is acceptable. What does the decision have to accomplish? What must this decision attain as a minimum so that we can move forward? These then are the elements of the decisions process. They have different strengths and resources and so their approach will not be as effective in your hands. Focus on the opportunity rather than the problem. Aim high and aim for something that will make a difference rather than something that is safe.

A decision without action is just a wish. Focus on these key points to help ensure an effective decision: But what of the decision itself? Chapter 7 — Effective Decisions A decision is a choice between alternatives based on information and judgement Common counsel on decision making is to first gather all of the information.

What are the boundary conditions for this decision? This makes you think of the future and what needs to be done first rather than the problem which is rooted in the past. Build in a feedback mechanism so that you can confirm the decision has been correct or make another decision if it is required. Set your priorities with courage rather than intelligent analysis. You will never have all the information you need so be brave. Effective executives make effective decisions.

Choose your own direction rather than following the crowd. Each fact must be considered for relevance and for its appropriate measurement.

The first question to ask is 'Is a decision really needed? Stops the decision making being constrained to the limits of the organisations thinking.

Beware the intuitive solution. Having made a decision the executive needs to consider the next action. The key points are: Decisions then.

Unless you consider alternatives you have a closed mind and may have missed a better solution. Record where the time is spent. Ensures you consider alternatives. If we all think the same then no one is thinking. The executive then encourages input so that various opinions can be tested against reality. Focus on the contribution. So any rigorous method needs to evolve from an awareness that opinions come first and analysis second.

Don't think right or wrong. Where is effort best spent? The executives job is to be effective. Eliminate wasted time and leaks and spend time where it is most effective. Make strength productive. They normally start with opinions as untested hypotheses.Eliminate wasted time and leaks and spend time where it is most effective.

Beware the intuitive solution. Eliminate wasted time and leaks and spend time where it is most effective. The goal of staffing is not to place a person but to fill a job. Clearly establishing boundary conditions also helps identify the worst of all decisions: "the decision that just might work if nothing goes wrong.

He may be the research director. Individual development often improves because the executive sets the self development standard for the organisation. The task of the executive therefore is not to change individuals but to multiply output and performance by applying each person to his strength and aspirations.